When they wanted to scale up the use of lifesaving commodities, the Ministry of Health of Uganda supported by WHO contracted us to recommend on the establishment of a local infomediary for the priority life-saving commodities. This was achieved by conducting an operational review/assessment of current efforts to locally generate, analyze, and use data to forecast demand for priority commodities in the public and private sectors. The consultancy was aimed at making recommendation on how to establish a local infomediary for priority commodities (Implants, amoxicillin, Zinc, Magnesium Sulfate, & Oxytocin).

Of the 94 facilities surveyed, the availability score/adequacy was estimated at 16.8%. The most commonly available information was demographic and epidemiology data with an availability score of 53.2%. The availability of supply chain and logistics data was at 15.80%, below the overall availability score. The other very critical information which was poorly available was National and nongovernmental organization program targets at 13.50%, country level procurement plans at 10.10%, consumer behavioral data at 5.50%, and historical consumption data at 4.30%. While respondents indicated that they had access to the data above, there was no information that could be readily shared. Respondents would typically ask for more time to share the information. Therefore, available information is probably not in a format that is easy to share. The top three categories of information respondents expect to find in the local infomediary are availability of drugs (26.1%), information on prices and cost of medicines (19.1%), and morbidity and population data (13.3%).

we invite you to check out our draft report and give us your helpful comments: Report establishment of local health infomediary for demand forecasts May 11, 2015

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